Aristotle’s tomb has NOT been found: Archaeologists doubt claims that philosopher’s final resting place was discovered in Greece

A Greek archaeologist who excavated the birthplace of Aristotle in northern Greece in the 1990s says a destroyed structure he discovered may have been the tomb of the ancient philosopher and teacher of Alexander the Great.

Konstantinos Sismanidis concedes that he has “no proof but just strong indications” to back up his theory, presented Thursday at a conference marking the 2,400th anniversary of the philosopher’s birth.

Aristotle (384-322 BC) was a pupil of Plato and one of history’s most influential thinkers.

Sismanidis said the structure unearthed in the ruins of Stageira, 70 kilometers (43 miles) east of Thessaloniki, was once a public monument where Aristotle was honored after his death. No human remains were found there.

Sismanidis also quoted medieval references to Aristotle’s ashes being interred in his hometown.

Aristotle’s tomb has NOT been found: Archaeologists doubt claims that philosopher’s final resting place was discovered in Greece

  • A claim was made last week that his tomb had been found in Stagira
  • Experts say there is not enough evidence to link the tomb to Aristotle
  • No human remains or inscriptions about Aristotle were found at the time
  • Another archaeologist claimed to have found his tomb in 1891 

He is one of the great ancient Greek philosophers whose thinking has helped to shape much of modern science.

Yet despite his contribution to history, the final resting place of Aristotle has been lost in time following his death in 322BC.

Last week an excavator claimed he had uncovered what could be the tomb of the man widely regarded to be the world’s first genuine scientist at the site of ancient Stagira.

However, archaeologists are now doubting the claims, saying there is not enough evidence to link the tomb to Aristotle.

Konstantinos Sismanidis claimed to have found Aristotle's tomb in Ancient Stagira in the Central Macedonia region of Greece (pictured)

Konstantinos Sismanidis claimed to have found Aristotle’s tomb in Ancient Stagira in the Central Macedonia region of Greece (pictured)

Konstantinos Sismanidis, the archaeologist who claimed to have found the tomb, presented his findings at the ‘Aristotle 2,400 Years World Congress’.

However, speaking to Sigma Live, Mr Sismanidis, said: ‘I have no hard proof, but strong indications lead me to almost certainty.’

Mr Sismanidis claimed that all the indications, from the location of the tomb, to the period it was erected, suggest that the edifice was indeed Aristotle’s tomb.

He added that the tomb was probably unknown before now as it was destroyed by Byzantines, who built a square tower on top of it.

The tomb has been found in the Ancient Stagira region of Greece (pictured on map)

The tomb has been found in the Ancient Stagira region of Greece (pictured on map)

A statue of Aristotle (pictured) sits in the mountain village of Stagira on the peninsula of Chalcidice in Greece

A statue of Aristotle (pictured) sits in the mountain village of Stagira on the peninsula of Chalcidice in Greece

However, no human remains or inscriptions mentioning Aristotle were discovered in the site at Stagira.

Aristotle was born in Stagira in 384 BC and died in Chalcis, Evia, at 322 BC.

The great philosopher was originally believed to have been buried at Chalcis, however, Mr Sismanidis’ team suggested that the people of Stagira may have transferred his ashes to his birthplace.

Since the announcement of the finding, there has been skepticism from many other archaeologists.

Speaking to Live Science, R Angus Smith, an archaeology professor at Brock University, said: ‘It would be lovely if true, but I have not seen evidence to convince me of the connection.’

This is not the first time a claim has been made of finding Aristotle’s tomb.

In 1891, Charles Waldstein, an archaeologist at the American School of Archaeology of Athens, claimed to have found Aristotle’s tomb at the site of Eretria.

This site is much closer to where his remains were believed to have been buried.

Unfortunately, as no human remains or inscriptions were found at either sites, there is no way to know whether his tomb has been found.

read more at http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3619777/Aristotle-s-tomb-NOT-Archaeologists-doubt-claims-philosopher-s-final-resting-place-discovered-Greec.html

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